abash

əˈbaSH

cause to feel embarrassed, disconcerted, or ashamed.

“he was not abashed at being held”

synonyms:   embarrassed, ashamed, shamefaced, remorseful, conscience-stricken, mortified, humiliated, humbled, chagrined, crestfallen, sheepish, red-faced, blushing, put out of countenance, with one’s tail between one’s legs

 

abduct

abˈdəkt

take (someone) away illegally by force or deception; kidnap.

“her child has been  abducted”

synonyms:   kidnap, carry off, seize, capture, run away/off with, make off with, spirit away

 

abhor

abˈhôr,əbˈhôr

regard with disgust and hatred.

“I abhor the taste of liver”

synonyms:   detest, hate, loathe, despise, execrate, regard with disgust, shrink from, recoil from, shudder at; formal abominate

 

abject

ˈabˌjekt,abˈjekt

(of a situation or condition) extremely bad, unpleasant, and degrading.

“abject poverty”

synonyms:   wretched, miserable, hopeless, pathetic, pitiful, pitiable, piteous, sorry, woeful, lamentable, degrading, appalling, atrocious, awful “abject poverty”

  1. (of a person or their behavior) completely without pride or dignity; self-abasing.

“an abject apology”

synonyms:   contemptible, base, low, vile, worthless, debased, degraded, despicable, ignominious, mean, unworthy, ignoble

 

adjudicate

əˈjo͞odəˌkāt

make a formal judgment or decision about a problem or disputed matter.

“The group adjudicates on all wagering dissimilarities”.  act as a critic in a rivalry.  “W

she asked him to adjudicate at the indigenous floret show”

synonyms:   judge, try, hear, examine, arbitrate, referee, umpire; pronounce or declare judicially.

“she was adjudicated penniless”

 

abjure

abˈjo͝or,əbˈjo͝or

solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim).

“her denial to abjure the Christian faith”

synonyms:   renounce, relinquish, reject, forgo, disavow, abandon, deny, repudiate, give up, wash one’s hands of

 

abnegation

ˌabnəˈɡāSH

the act of renouncing or rejecting something.

“abnegation of radical judicial control”

synonyms:   renunciation, rejection, refusal, abandonment, abdication, surrender, relinquishment, repudiation, denial; formal abjuration

 

abnormal

abˈnôrməl

deviating from what is normal or usual, typically in a way that is undesirable or worrying.

“the illness is identifiable from the patient’s abnormal manners”

synonyms:   unusual, uncommon, atypical, untypical, nontypical, unrepresentative, rare, isolated, irregular, anomalous, deviant, divergent, aberrant, freak, freakish

 

abominate

əˈbäməˌnāt

detest; loathe.

“they abominated the same notion of dominion”

synonyms:   detest, loathe, hate, abhor, despise, execrate, shudder at, recoil from, shrink from, be repelled by

 

abrogate

ˈabrəˌɡāt

repeal or do away with (a law, right, or formal agreement).

“a plan to abrogate concisely the right to attack”

synonyms:   repeal, revoke, rescind, repudiate, overturn, annul

 

abstain

əbˈstān

  1. restrain oneself from doing or enjoying something.

“abstain from sex”

  1. formally decline to vote either for or against a proposal or motion.

“fifty-five supported with the opposition, and approximately eighty others abstained”

 

abstemious

əbˈstēmēəs

not self-indulgent, especially when eating and drinking.

““We only had a few cans.” “Very abstemious of you.””

synonyms:   self-denying, temperate, abstinent, moderate, self-disciplined, restrained, self-restrained, sober, austere, ascetic, puritanical, spartan, hair-shirt

 

accentuate

əkˈsen

make more noticeable or prominent.

“his coat tactlessly accentuated his belly”

synonyms:   focus attention on, draw attention to, point up, underline, underscore, accent, highlight, spotlight, foreground, feature, play up, bring to the fore, heighten, stress, emphasize

 

acclaim

əˈklām

praise enthusiastically and publicly.

“the meeting was acclaimed as a great turnout”

synonyms:   praise, applaud, cheer, commend, approve, welcome, pay tribute to, speak highly of, eulogize, compliment, celebrate, sing the praises of, rave about, heap praise on/upon, wax lyrical about, lionize, exalt, admire, hail, extol, honor, hymn

 

accolade

ˈakəˌlād

  1. an award or privilege granted as a special honor or as an acknowledgment of merit.

“the ultimate certified accolade of a social call by the head of state”

synonyms:   honor, privilege, award, gift, title

  1. a touch on a person’s shoulders with a sword at the bestowing of a knighthood.

 

accost

əˈkôst,əˈkäst

approach and address (someone) boldly or aggressively.

“reporters accosted her in the road”

synonyms:   confront, call to, shout to, hail, address, speak to

 

acerbity

uh-sur-bi-tee

a sharp bitterness:  bitter

the property of having a harsh unpleasant taste

Synonyms:   tartness

 

acrid

ˈakrəd

having an irritatingly strong and unpleasant taste or smell.

“acrid fumes”

synonyms:   pungent, bitter, sharp, sour, tart, caustic, harsh, irritating, acid, acidic, vinegary, acetic, acetous

angry and bitter.

“an acrid farewell”

 

acrimonious

ˌakrəˈmōnēəs

(typically of speech or a debate) angry and bitter.

“an acrimonious disagreement about earnings”

synonyms:   bitter, angry, rancorous, caustic, acerbic, scathing, sarcastic, acid, harsh, sharp, cutting

 

acrimony

ˈakrəˌmōnē

bitterness or ill feeling.

“a dilemma of complaints, acrimony, and finger-pointing”

synonyms:   bitterness, anger, rancor, resentment, ill feeling, ill will, bad blood, animosity, hostility, enmity, antagonism, waspishness, spleen, malice, spite, spitefulness, peevishness, venom

“the conference finished with acrimony on both sides”

 

 

actuate

[ak-choo-eyt]

Spell  Syllables

Word Origin

See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), actuated, actuating.

  1. to incite or move to action; impel; motivate:

actuated by selfish motives.

  1. to put into action; start a process; turn on:

to actuate a machine.

 

acumen

əˈkyo͞omən,ˈakyəmən

the ability to make good judgments and quick decisions, typically in a particular domain.

“business acumen”

synonyms:   astuteness, shrewdness, acuity, sharpness, sharp-wittedness, cleverness, smartness, brains

 

adamant

ˈadəmənt

  1. refusing to be persuaded or to change one’s mind.

“she is adamant that he is not going to step down”

synonyms:    unshakable, immovable, inflexible, unwavering, unswerving, uncompromising, insistent, resolute, resolved, determined, firm, steadfast

  1. a legendary rock or mineral to which many, often contradictory, properties were attributed, formerly associated with diamond or lodestone.

 

adamantine

ˌadəˈmanˌtēn,ˌadəˈmanˌtīn

unbreakable.

“adamantine restraints”

 

 

adduce

əˈd(y)o͞os

cite as evidence.

“a number of reasons are adduced to enlighten the circumstances”

synonyms:   cite, quote, name, mention, instance, point out, refer to

 

 

ADONIS : could not find meaning of the word

 

adulation

ˌajəˈlāSH

obsequious flattery; excessive admiration or praise.

“they found it challenging to deal with the adulation of the followers”

synonyms:  hero worship, worship, idolization, adoration, admiration, veneration, awe, devotion, glorification, praise, flattery, blandishments

“unspoiled by all the adulation she’s has gotten”

 

affluence

ˈaflo͞oəns

the state of having a great deal of money; wealth.

“a indication of our increasing affluence”

 

affront

əˈfrənt

  1. an action or remark that causes outrage or offense.

“she took her son’s abandonment as a personal affront”

synonyms:  insult, offense, indignity, slight, snub, put-down, provocation, injury

  1. offend the modesty or values of.

“he was affronted by his knowledge”

synonyms:  insult, offend, mortify, provoke, pique, wound, hurt

 

aficionado

əˌfiSHəˈnädō, əˌfisyəˈnädō

a person who is very knowledgeable and enthusiastic about an activity, subject, or pastime.

“aficionados of the handpicked strawberries”

synonyms:  connoisseur, expert, authority, specialist, pundit, cognoscente

 

aggrandize

əˈɡranˌdīz

increase the power, status, or wealth of.

“an action projected to aggrandize the Jones empire”

 

aggregate

ˈaɡriɡət

  1. a whole formed by combining several (typically disparate) elements.

“the board was an aggregate of three local associations”

  1. a material or structure formed from a loosely compacted mass of fragments or particles.

synonyms:  collection, mass, agglomeration, conglomerate, assemblage

  1. formed or calculated by the combination of many separate units or items; total.

“the aggregate total of contributions made”

synonyms:  total, combined, gross, overall, composite

“an aggregate score”

 

aggrieved

əˈɡrēvd

feeling resentment at having been unfairly treated.

“he aggrieved at the outcome”

synonyms:   resentful, affronted, indignant, disgruntled, discontented, upset, offended, piqued, riled, nettled, vexed, irked, irritated, annoyed, put out, chagrined

 

agnostic

aɡˈnästik

  1. a person who believes that nothing is known or can be known of the existence or nature of God or of anything beyond material phenomena; a person who claims neither faith nor disbelief in God.

synonyms:    skeptic, doubter, doubting Thomas, cynic

  1. of or relating to agnostics or agnosticism.

synonyms:   skeptic, doubter, doubting Thomas, cynic

 

 

alacrity

əˈlakrədē

brisk and cheerful readiness.

“he acknowledged the request with alacrity”

synonyms:    eagerness, willingness, readiness

 

alienate

ˈālyəˌnāt

  1. cause (someone) to feel isolated or estranged.

“an urban background that would alienate its residents”

synonyms:    estrange, divide, distance, put at a distance, isolate, cut off

  1. .LAW

transfer ownership of (property rights) to another person or group.

synonyms:    estrange, divide, distance, put at a distance, isolate, cut off

 

allay

əˈlā

diminish or put at rest (fear, suspicion, or worry).

“the information attempted to instruct the community and allay doubts”

synonyms:   reduce, diminish, decrease, lessen, assuage, alleviate, ease, relieve, soothe, soften, calm, take the edge off

altercation

ˌôltərˈkāSH

a noisy argument or disagreement, especially in public.

“they had an altercation with the performer”

synonyms:    argument, quarrel, squabble, fight, shouting match, disagreement, contretemps, difference of opinion, falling-out, dispute, disputation, clash, fracas, wrangle, blowup, skirmish, run-in, war of words, donnybrook

 

altruism

ˈaltro͞oˌizəm

the belief in or practice of disinterested and selfless concern for the well-being of others.

“some may elect to work with helpless aging people out of altruism”

 

ambience

ˈambēəns

the character and atmosphere of a place.

“the stress-free ambience of the cocktail lounge is common with visitors”

synonyms:   atmosphere, air, aura, climate, mood, feel, feeling, character, quality, impression, complexion, flavor, look, tone, tenor

 

ameliorate

əˈmēlyəˌrāt

make (something bad or unsatisfactory) better.

“the improvement did much to ameliorate living standards”

synonyms:   improve, make better, better, make improvements to, enhance, help, benefit, boost, amend

 

amorphous

əˈmôrfəs

without a clearly defined shape or form.

“amorphous blue forms and straight black lines”

synonyms:   shapeless, formless, structureless, indeterminate; More

vague; ill-organized; unclassifiable.

“make evident the amorphous statements”

 

anachronism

əˈnakrəˌnizəm

a thing belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists, especially a thing that is conspicuously old-fashioned.

“everything was as it would have looked in times earlier apart from one anachronism, a upbeat buttery production hoist”

anagram

ˈanəˌɡram

a word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as cinema, formed from iceman.

analogous

əˈnaləɡəs

comparable in certain respects, typically in a way that makes clearer the nature of the things compared.

“they saw the connection between a ruler and his subjects as analogous to that of dad and his offspring”

synonyms:   comparable, parallel, similar, like, akin, corresponding, related, kindred, equivalent

 

anarchy

ˈanərkē

a state of disorder due to absence or no recognition of authority.

“she must ensure communal instruction in a country threatened with anarchy”

synonyms:   lawlessness, nihilism, mobocracy, revolution, insurrection, disorder, chaos, mayhem, tumult, turmoil

“conditions are seriously ready for anarchy”

 

anathema

əˈnaTHəmə

  1. something or someone that one vehemently dislikes.

“racial disgust was anathema to them”

synonyms:    an abomination, an outrage, an abhorrence, a disgrace, an evil, a bane, a bugbear, a bête noire; More

  1. a formal curse by a pope or a council of the Church, removing a person or condemning a policy.

synonyms:    an abomination, an outrage, an abhorrence, a disgrace, an evil, a bane, a bugbear, a bête noire

 

 

anchorite

ˈaNGkəˌrīt

anchorite; plural noun: anchorites; noun: anchoret; plural noun: anchoret’s

a religious reclus

 

anemia

əˈnēmēə

anaemia; noun: anemia

a condition marked by a deficiency of red blood cells or of hemoglobin in the blood, resulting in pallor and weariness.

 

angst

äNG(k)st

a feeling of deep anxiety or dread, typically an unfocused one about the human condition or the state of the world in general.

“adolescent angst” synonyms:   anxiety, fear, apprehension, worry, foreboding, trepidation, malaise, disquiet, disquietude, unease, uneasiness

“corporate frontrunners voiced their angst over warfare and decline”

a feeling of persistent worry about something trivial.

 

animosity

ˌanəˈmäsədē

strong hostility.

“she no longer sensed any animosity concerning her”

synonyms:    antipathy, hostility, friction, antagonism, acrimony, enmity, animus, bitterness, rancor, resentment, dislike, ill feeling/will, bad blood, hatred, hate, loathing

 

animus

ˈanəməs

  1. hostility or ill feeling.

“the writer’s animus toward him”

  1. motivation to do something.
  2. “the campaigner animus originated from within the Party”

 

 

anomaly

əˈnäməlē

  1. something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected.

“there are a number of anomalies in the current organization”

synonyms:    oddity, peculiarity, abnormality, irregularity, inconsistency, incongruity, aberration, quirk, rarity

“the tumor on the duck’s bill is a mild anomaly”

  1. ASTRONOMY

the angular distance of a planet or satellite from its last perihelion or perigee.

 

 

anomie

ˈanəˌmē

lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.

“the notion that high-rise building leads to anomie in the residents”

 

 

anonymous

əˈnänəməs

(of a person) not identified by name; of unknown name.

“the anonymous novelist of Beowulf”

synonyms:   unnamed, of unknown name, nameless, incognito, unidentified, unknown, unsourced, secret More

having no outstanding, individual, or unusual features; unremarkable or impersonal.

synonyms:   characterless, nondescript, impersonal, faceless

“an anonymous lodging improvement”

used in names of support groups for addicts of a substance or behavior to indicate the confidentiality maintained among members of the group. “Alcoholics Anonymous”

antagonism

anˈtaɡəˌnizəm

active hostility or opposition.

“the antagonism among the crew”

synonyms:   hostility, friction, enmity, antipathy, animus, opposition, dissension, rivalry; More

 

antebellum

ˌantēˈbeləm

occurring or existing before a particular war, especially the American Civil War.

“the treaties of the antebellum South”

 

 

antecedent

ˌan(t)əˈsēdnt

  1. a thing or event that existed before or logically precedes another.

“some antecedents to the African novel might exist in Africa’s oral traditions”

synonyms:    precursor, forerunner, predecessor

“the guitar’s antecedent”

  1. preceding in time or order; previous or preexisting.

“the antecedent events that prompt you to break a diet”

synonyms:   previous, earlier, prior, preceding, precursory, former, foregoing; formal anterior

“antecedent events”

antedate

ˈan(t)iˌdāt

precede in time; come before (something) in date.

“a evolution that antedated the Ancient Kingdom”

synonyms:   precede, predate, come/go before, be earlier than

indicate or discover that (a document, event, or word) should be assigned to an earlier date.

 

antediluvian

ˌan(t)ēdəˈlo͞ovēən

of or belonging to the time before the biblical Flood.

“gigantic skeletons of antediluvian creatures”

synonyms:    out of date, outdated, outmoded, old-fashioned, antiquated, behind the times, passé

“her antediluvian outlooks”

humorous

ridiculously old-fashioned.

Email: Skip.Payne@pcocs.org "Get Involved"

 

Are you registered to vote?

Stand Up and Be Counted...

CLICK HERE - Register To Vote Today

Vote Early in America's Elections...